LLOYD WRIGHT

Born in 1890, Frank Lloyd Wright Jr. was the son of renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Following in his father’s famous footsteps, architect Lloyd Wright shaped his own architectural way with a distinctive individualistic approach. Spending his early years in Oak Park, Illinois and Spring Green, Wisconsin, Wright attended the university there. Due to his father moving to Italy, he traveled extensively throughout Europe.

He was the production designer at Paramount Studios, responsible for the immense castle and 12th-century village sets for Douglas Fairbanks version of Robin Hood. In 1911 he took a position with esteemed Boston landscape firm Olmsted and Olmsted. Wright then transferred to San Diego, to oversee work for the 1915 Pan-Pacific Exposition. He made his way to Los Angeles and encouraged his father to come to the city. Wright supervised some of the site work for his father’s projects, including the famous Hollyhock House.

His individual projects showed the clear influence of his father while, introducing his own new ideas. He created several homes using his approach to the “textile block” system, including the Sowden House in Los Feliz, and Samuel-Novarro House in Hollywood. Others include the 1923 Millard House in Pasadena, California where Lloyd designed the grounds, and contributed an adjacent studio building in 1926.

Lloyd Wright’s first residential commission, the Taggart House is a registered Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, near Griffith Park. He also designed the second and third band shells at the Hollywood Bowl. His best-known project is the Wayfarers Chapel, also known as “The Glass Church,” on the Palos Verdes Peninsula, and is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Your thoughts, ideas, comments...