Michel Boyer // Luxe 70s Comfort

Interior architect and designer Michel Boyer, studied under renowned decorator, André Arbus and began his career specializing in office furniture in corporate interiors, offices and banks. He is known for his clean sleek shapes and monoblock designs with a luxurious undertone. Boyer played with solids and voids in familiar geometric shapes and established a certain standard of 1970s style. By the end of the 1960s, Boyer began receiving many private commissions for prestigious clients such as Elie de Rothschild, Lilian Betencourt and Karim Aga Khan. One of his most well known commissions was for the interior architecture of the Rothschild Bank in the 70s. He also worked with fashion desighers including Lanvin, Dior and Balmain. His designs emanate the inviting comfort of objects and interiors made for people not for buildings.
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A striking pair of lounge chairs, linear tubes of foam covered in leather lie on top of an extruded metal tubing structure, c. 1971.
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An important waterfall desk created by Boyer for the Rothschild Bank. This “Directors” desk in constructed of hardwood, covered with walnut veneer, lacquered Formica, aluminum and a brushed stainless steel reveal running the entire length of the piece, c. 1970.
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This candlestick holder consists of four independent interlocking chrome plated tubes which “hug” each other to create an interesting composite, c. 1972.
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Pair of X stools, Michel Boyer used the materials of his era in these privileged curvilinear architectural forms, c. 1970s.
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Boyer gave the same attention to the decorative arts as his interiors and furniture. This rectangular brushed steel mirror is elegant and modern at the same time, steel being one of Boyers favorite materials, c. 1970s. The “Organ Pipe” floor or table lamp is a dichotomy of simplicity and complexity, constructed of chromed metal, c. 1960s.
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A pair of luxe lounge chairs, with Michel Boyer’s classic curvilinear steel base and padded velvet cushions. These chairs are a perfect example of Boyer’s ability to blend hard and soft materials to create a unique piece, c. 1970s.