Legendary Italian Designer Joe Colombo

joe-colombo-elda-chair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Italian product designer Joe Colombo (1930-1971) produced a series of innovations which made him one of Italy’s most influential product designers of his time. The first chair he designed in 1963 was the Elda armchair, named after his wife.  It is made out of fiberglass.  It was created for the italian manufacturer comfort.

joe-colombo-lamp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These lamps designed in 1967 for Kartell.  These lamps can be stacked together, or have them side by side.

joe-colombo-tube-chair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The modular components of his “Tube” chair can be arranged in any combination to suit the user, and can even be nested together one inside the other.  The foam-covered PVC tubes can be used in any number and combination, accommodating one or more people.
joe-colombo-storage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Boby Storage trolley is a must have workspace organizer for the business and the home office.  The timeless storage trollley par excellence.
In 1962, Joe Colombo opened a design studio on viale Piave in Milan where he worked on architectural commissions, mostly interiors for ski lodges and mountain hotels (together with jazz and cars, skiing was one of his passions). He also continued his experiments in product design to which he applied the same love of bold, folding, curvaceous forms – and hatred of sharp corners and straight lines – that had characterised his paintings and sculpture.

joe-colombo-table

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Poker Card Table designed for Zanotta never made poker looked so good.  This square card table is topped with a white layered plastic laminate and removable, leather trimmed baize.

joe-colombo-chair

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joe Colombo has begun with aluminum, then ABS and finally, polypropylene.  Stackable and easy-to-clean, the Universale chair is also adjustable because its legs can be unscrewed and replaced with longer ones.  He struggled for two years to perfect it for mass-production and finally succeeded in 1967.